Marketing Day: Google Shopping, ad blockers on Facebook & Twitter Moments

marketing-day-header-v2-mday

Here’s our recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.

From Marketing Land:

Recent Headlines From Search Engine Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Search News & Information:

Online Marketing News From Around The Web:

Analytics

Blogs & Blogging

Business Issues

Content Marketing

Conversion Optimization

Copywriting, Design & Usability

E-Commerce

Email Marketing

General Internet Marketing

Internet Marketing Industry

MarTech

Mobile/Local Marketing

Other Items

Social Media

Video

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Advanced Google Shopping: Is price a proxy for Quality Score in product ads?

google-shopping-products1c-ss-1920

In June, I spoke as part of the “Mad Scientists of Paid Search” panel session at SMX Advanced in Seattle. During the session, I presented Crealytics’ latest research on Google Shopping. The presentation included some findings relating to user behavior within the channel and uncovered how much product price really impacts performance.

We’ve had a lot of questions as to how we came to those numbers, so I would like to share some answers with you now.

SMX-mad scientists_AndreasReiffen

Consumers don’t buy what they search for

For a deeper insight into what is actually going on in Google Shopping, we analyzed a data set of more than 15,000 Google Shopping conversions across the German, UK and US markets covering several international retailers from the fashion, sports, outdoor and luxury sectors. We looked at search queries, clicked product ads and products purchased.

Surprisingly, the vast proportion of consumers don’t buy the products they search for (and click on). Analysis of the data found that only 34 percent of products purchased via Google Shopping match the product ad that was clicked on. We could also see that 30 percent of users bought a product by the same designer, but from a different product category, and 36 percent of users bought a product from a completely different designer.

What does this mean for advertisers? Understanding the link between what was clicked and what was bought becomes very important. This way, advertisers will be able to raise bids on the ads that actually lead to sales of the products they want to push.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

from Marketing Land http://ift.tt/2aIifn4

via New Digital Tips

Advanced Google Shopping: Is price a proxy for Quality Score in product ads?

google-shopping-products1c-ss-1920

In June, I spoke as part of the “Mad Scientists of Paid Search” panel session at SMX Advanced in Seattle. During the session, I presented Crealytics’ latest research on Google Shopping. The presentation included some findings relating to user behavior within the channel and uncovered how much product price really impacts performance.

We’ve had a lot of questions as to how we came to those numbers, so I would like to share some answers with you now.

SMX-mad scientists_AndreasReiffen

Consumers don’t buy what they search for

For a deeper insight into what is actually going on in Google Shopping, we analyzed a data set of more than 15,000 Google Shopping conversions across the German, UK and US markets covering several international retailers from the fashion, sports, outdoor and luxury sectors. We looked at search queries, clicked product ads and products purchased.

Surprisingly, the vast proportion of consumers don’t buy the products they search for (and click on). Analysis of the data found that only 34 percent of products purchased via Google Shopping match the product ad that was clicked on. We could also see that 30 percent of users bought a product by the same designer, but from a different product category, and 36 percent of users bought a product from a completely different designer.

What does this mean for advertisers? Understanding the link between what was clicked and what was bought becomes very important. This way, advertisers will be able to raise bids on the ads that actually lead to sales of the products they want to push.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

from Marketing Land http://ift.tt/2aIifn4

via New Digital Tips

Advanced Google Shopping: Is price a proxy for Quality Score in product ads?

google-shopping-products1c-ss-1920

In June, I spoke as part of the “Mad Scientists of Paid Search” panel session at SMX Advanced in Seattle. During the session, I presented Crealytics’ latest research on Google Shopping. The presentation included some findings relating to user behavior within the channel and uncovered how much product price really impacts performance.

We’ve had a lot of questions as to how we came to those numbers, so I would like to share some answers with you now.

SMX-mad scientists_AndreasReiffen

Consumers don’t buy what they search for

For a deeper insight into what is actually going on in Google Shopping, we analyzed a data set of more than 15,000 Google Shopping conversions across the German, UK and US markets covering several international retailers from the fashion, sports, outdoor and luxury sectors. We looked at search queries, clicked product ads and products purchased.

Surprisingly, the vast proportion of consumers don’t buy the products they search for (and click on). Analysis of the data found that only 34 percent of products purchased via Google Shopping match the product ad that was clicked on. We could also see that 30 percent of users bought a product by the same designer, but from a different product category, and 36 percent of users bought a product from a completely different designer.

What does this mean for advertisers? Understanding the link between what was clicked and what was bought becomes very important. This way, advertisers will be able to raise bids on the ads that actually lead to sales of the products they want to push.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

from Marketing Land http://ift.tt/2aIifn4

via New Digital Tips

Advanced Google Shopping: Is price a proxy for Quality Score in product ads?

google-shopping-products1c-ss-1920

In June, I spoke as part of the “Mad Scientists of Paid Search” panel session at SMX Advanced in Seattle. During the session, I presented Crealytics’ latest research on Google Shopping. The presentation included some findings relating to user behavior within the channel and uncovered how much product price really impacts performance.

We’ve had a lot of questions as to how we came to those numbers, so I would like to share some answers with you now.

SMX-mad scientists_AndreasReiffen

Consumers don’t buy what they search for

For a deeper insight into what is actually going on in Google Shopping, we analyzed a data set of more than 15,000 Google Shopping conversions across the German, UK and US markets covering several international retailers from the fashion, sports, outdoor and luxury sectors. We looked at search queries, clicked product ads and products purchased.

Surprisingly, the vast proportion of consumers don’t buy the products they search for (and click on). Analysis of the data found that only 34 percent of products purchased via Google Shopping match the product ad that was clicked on. We could also see that 30 percent of users bought a product by the same designer, but from a different product category, and 36 percent of users bought a product from a completely different designer.

What does this mean for advertisers? Understanding the link between what was clicked and what was bought becomes very important. This way, advertisers will be able to raise bids on the ads that actually lead to sales of the products they want to push.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

from Marketing Land http://ift.tt/2aIifn4

via New Digital Tips

Advanced Google Shopping: Is price a proxy for Quality Score in product ads?

google-shopping-products1c-ss-1920

In June, I spoke as part of the “Mad Scientists of Paid Search” panel session at SMX Advanced in Seattle. During the session, I presented Crealytics’ latest research on Google Shopping. The presentation included some findings relating to user behavior within the channel and uncovered how much product price really impacts performance.

We’ve had a lot of questions as to how we came to those numbers, so I would like to share some answers with you now.

SMX-mad scientists_AndreasReiffen

Consumers don’t buy what they search for

For a deeper insight into what is actually going on in Google Shopping, we analyzed a data set of more than 15,000 Google Shopping conversions across the German, UK and US markets covering several international retailers from the fashion, sports, outdoor and luxury sectors. We looked at search queries, clicked product ads and products purchased.

Surprisingly, the vast proportion of consumers don’t buy the products they search for (and click on). Analysis of the data found that only 34 percent of products purchased via Google Shopping match the product ad that was clicked on. We could also see that 30 percent of users bought a product by the same designer, but from a different product category, and 36 percent of users bought a product from a completely different designer.

What does this mean for advertisers? Understanding the link between what was clicked and what was bought becomes very important. This way, advertisers will be able to raise bids on the ads that actually lead to sales of the products they want to push.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

from Marketing Land http://ift.tt/2aIifn4

via New Digital Tips

So we have 45 more characters in AdWords text ads… Now what?

google-search-tablet-1200

The one thing that’s remained constant in AdWords over the past 15 years is the good ol’ 25-35-35 character rule we worked with in text ads. And we’ve become pretty good at it.

But in May, it was announced that the old way of doing things would be changing to cater to the multiscreen world we live in. And on July 26, AdWords rolled out new character limits that change the way text ads display content.

The new character count is 30-30-80, and consists of:

  • two headlines of up to 30 characters of text; and
  • one condensed description line of up to 80 characters.

adwords expanded text ads changes

For many of us, the 25-35-35 thing has been engrained in our brains, and this change represents a huge shift.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

As we’re in uncharted territory, there’s sure to be lots of testing to come. In the announcement over at Google, it was reported that tests have shown that “some advertisers have reported increases in click-through rates of up to 20 percent compared to current text ads.”

From the announcement here at Search Engine Land on July 26 (linked to earlier), we see that Google is expecting advertisers to A/B test expanded text ads for a few months, allowing them to optimize these new ads to be just as effective as standard ads. And then the standard 25-35-35 ads will no longer be available:

As of October 26, 2016, however, advertisers will no longer be able to create or upload standard text ads. Google has not set a date when standard ads will no longer run with ETAs [expanded text ads], but Jain noted advertisers should have sufficient time to test standard and expanded ad formats against each other to ensure they are properly using ETAs. In other words, the expectation is that advertisers will run A/B tests with standard and expanded text ads for a period.

So what do you do when you have a vast landscape of 45 additional characters? Add more stuff? Sure, but strategically. Now is the time to be thinking about how you’ll use that extra space, and I’ll share a few things to consider next.

[Read the full article on Search Engine Land.]

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